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Hillside Harvest

Armani Nasser finds out about the work Tapton students have done to help a small cooperative that runs a communal allotment in the Rivelin Valley.

Hillside Harvest

Armani Nasser finds out about the work Tapton students have done to help a small cooperative that runs a communal allotment in the Rivelin Valley.

Many have said that in order to start a garden you need to have a knack for it, "The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies". The word we use to describe those who love gardening is ‘green fingered’ but on the 9th of December 2012 with the help of Mr Moffatt from the drama department and Luke Cutforth from the Sixth-form, a group of our Tapton students decided to put that quote to the test.

Hillside Harvest is a cooperative group where a handful of people come together to grow healthy produce on pieces of land called allotments. Our Tapton students went over to see what and how they grew their ‘produce’. “We grow all sorts of things; apples, beans, onions, potatoes; anything we want really. Whatever works” this was the reply of one of the members of the Hillside Harvest group and this was what motivated our students to try out a spot of gardening!

They taught the students the best way to plant the seeds and told them that it wasn’t only an opportunity to grow but to also work as a team and to socialise. They then went on to talk about composting and the finer details of all that was involved… but nothing could have prepared them for what they were about to smell. “It makes you want to gag!” was probably the most fitting description for the smell and that was the expert’s opinion, as for our lot, one whiff and the facial expressions said it all.

Although that wasn’t the most pleasant part of the process, it was the most important part, as it was this specific composting method that allows the plants to grow stronger and gives them the best chance of survival.

The day finished with more hard work and a general tidy up of the allotment. There was clearly a sense of achievement by everyone involved. The reward of keeping nature on track was only one small part of a wider love, a love that starts as small as a seed but with effort, care and patience can grow as big as a garden, as big as an allotment. I think our student’s fingers will definitely turn green from this experience, proving that “The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies".

Visit www.hillsideharvest.org.uk for more information on how to get involved in this project.

See below Tapton Video at Hillside Harvest:-