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My Olympic Experience

Fiona's Olympic dream -

As the summer fades in to Autumn Fiona Bell, a Y13 student here at Tapton helps us re-visit the euphoria of the London 2012 summer Olympics by sharing her amazing experience at the heart of the Games.

My Olympic Experience

Fiona's Olympic dream

As the summer fades in to Autumn Fiona Bell, a Y13 student here at Tapton helps us re-visit the euphoria of the London 2012 summer Olympics by sharing her amazing experience at the heart of the Games

This summer I had the experience of a lifetime. Thanks to the support of all who helped on my stalls, participated in my games and bought my cakes, I was a Games Maker.

This experience began last  December when my sports leaders group, the Sheffield Academy of Young Leaders, were selected to be one of the three Young Games Maker teams for indoor volleyball, out of the 100 groups who applied. After months of training to perfection I found myself standing in Earls Court catching volleyballs as they hurled towards me. It was unbelievable to think 3 million spectators were watching and if I made a mistake, I could have destroyed many athletes' lifelong ambitions.

 If you watched the volleyball games, you might have been entertained by those in my team of Courtside Assistants who had the role of "Big Moppers". This involved cleaning the court with a long mop in a choreographed routine, synchronised with the moppers on the opposite side of the court. Unfortunately I was too small to be a Big Mopper. Instead I was a "Quick Mopper" and a Ball Girl. Every time a player dived for the ball they left an attractive smear of sweat across the court; clearly a health and safety risk (like everything in life)! This is where my main role came into play. Sprinting on with two small towels, I would  vigorously wipe the floor each time a player came into contact with it. That could be up to 125 sprints every game!

 Although I was caught on camera a few times, for me the Olympics wasn't about fame. Knowing that my actions contributed to possibly the best Olympic Games yet, and made dreams happen was more than enough. It was not easy work; we had to be up at 5 am almost every morning and didn't finish our shifts on court until 1:30pm. In fact these were good hours compared to the other volunteers. Despite this, the Games Makers were recognised for their good spirit and brilliant service to both the athletes and the public. No matter how tired or fed up we felt, we smiled. These days it is unusual for a stranger to spark up conversation with you on the bus or to have a day where you don't complain. During the Games Britain was a much more cheerful and pleasant place to be. I hope that the Olympics was not only an inspiration to do more sport but also to be good-hearted British people.